Lockdown Lit Fest

The lockdown is certainly creating a great deal of creativity when it comes to meeting up.  I have recorded music with my choir and have regular orchestra and ballet rehearsals over Zoom.  It has been fun to see everyone and to have a bit of structure in the week.

My favourite discovery so far though has been the rise of online literary festivals.  I love book festivals but I can’t usually get to many of them so the idea of having them come to me is just wonderful.  Obviously it’s not the same as getting to go to them but it is far better than nothing.

The online Hay Festival is coming up at the end of this week and I have booked my place at a whole load of the talks.  I am going to be in front of a screen for an awful lot of time next week!

First though, Chawton House had their own lockdown festival this past weekend.  Apparently they’ve been wanting to do a festival for a while and the lockdown pushed them into putting something together.  I have to say that if they do manage to have an actual in person festival I will be doing my very best to get there.  Even if they don’t, I have realised that I need to visit – the only time I’ve been to the house was for the AGM of the Jane Austen Society so I didn’t get to see very much of it (I have made a proper visit to Jane Austen’s House Museum but I would love to see that again as well).

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I have had a lovely weekend watching the talks and feeling very intellectual for doing so.  It was so interesting to see a bit of behind the scenes of the house and to learn more not just about the people who lived there but also about some related books – like The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner which is out next week and sounds great.  I also had a brilliant time playing with some found poetry using lines from poems in the house.

I have come away with a renewed enthusiasm for 18th and 19th century writers and a list of new to me authors to try.  I’m pretty sure I’ve heard of George Sand but not Jane West or Jane Porter and I certainly haven’t read any of them.  They are firmly on my list now though and I am very keen to read them soon.  It is such a great feeling!

The festival is obviously over now but some of the talks are still available on the Chawton House youtube channel.  If you can I would highly recommend you have a watch!

Unexpected Adventures with a Book

This week was supposed to see my very first visit to the London Book Fair. I was incredibly excited and so, although it was absolutely the correct decision, I was very disappointed when it was cancelled. I decided that I would use the free time for my own literary adventures instead.

I started off with a visit to Westward Ho! – named after Charles Kingsley’s novel but also known for its connection to Kipling. I read Stalky & Co – which was based on his time at the United Services College near Westward Ho! – a couple of years ago and I loved it. The first stanza of If is set into the seafront and I had a lovely time walking along reading it.

It was a very blustery day and the wind was icy cold but that just made it more exciting. Plus, it meant we were thoroughly justified in warming up in the cafe!

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I also went to visit Malmsmead and the church of St Mary the Virgin at Oare – both places featured in Lorna Doone. The church is particularly significant as it is where Lorna and John Ridd were married – the shot is said to have been fired through the window on my right.

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The mist had really come down over Exmoor which gave gave a perfect eerie feeling to the day. However, for me no literary pilgrimage to the moor is complete without a picnic so – despite the non-existent view – we parked up and settled down for several hours of reading and eating. Inside the car of course – it was still far too windy and cold (not to mention the rain) to eat outside! It was a perfect afternoon.

The Joy of Serendipity

On Monday I was hurrying along the street towards the railway station when I came upon an Oxfam bookshop. I didn’t really have time to stop but I could see a very attractive classics section just inside the door and decided I could spare a couple of minutes to browse that at least.

There were some good books there but nothing I wanted to buy and I was just turning away when my eye fell on the poetry section – specifically a book of medieval Latin lyrics.

In a few weeks I will be going to the Cheltenham Literary Festival and I am especially excited about a talk on how to read a Latin poem. This focuses specifically on two poems – one (part of Ovid’s Amores) I have already and the other the Confession of the Archpoet which I have been struggling a bit to find. The problem is that I want an edition with both the Latin and the English translation – although I have done some Latin I am not yet good enough to read a whole poem easily but I didn’t want to just have the translation which would kind of defeat the point!

Anyway, there I was in the bookshop with the Latin lyrics in my hand and thinking that the Confession is a medieval poem – and a pretty famous one at that. Surely it might well be in this very book? A quick flick through located it and even better it was there in both Latin and English. I snatched it up. Thankfully I also managed to catch my train home.

It just goes to show – it is always a good idea to visit any bookshop you may come across!